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CAS Dress Code Policy

Before you dash to the store to pick out that perfect, new “back to school” outfit, please take a moment to read through our dress code policy below. 

DRESS CODE (K-8)

A dress code creates an environment that is free of distractions and encourages appropriate behavior so that students may excel academically.  Students at CAS will be expected to conform to a uniform dress code.  This uniform shall consist of a solid red, white, or navy blue polo shirt, and khaki or denim pants, shorts, or skirts.

Tops: Red, White, or Navy Blue (solid colors only)

Short or long-sleeved collared polo shirt, with no pockets, in the approved uniform colors.

Plain, red, white, or navy blue long-sleeved shirts/t-shirts may be worn under the polo shirt during the winter months.  The shirt/t-shirt must be appropriately sized and must not extend beyond the hem of the polo shirt.

Only one polo shirt at a time may be worn.

A light-weight, front-zippered jacket may be worn inside the buildings; however, the jacket must remain unzipped and open while inside.  NO SWEATSHIRTS MAY BE WORN.

Bottoms:  Blue jeans, Black, or Khaki/Tan:

Jeans, straight-legged trousers, shorts, and skirts in the approved colors are permitted.

All bottoms must be in good condition and hemmed (not frayed, ripped, cutoff, or containing holes).  Pants/shorts must fit at the waist.  Shorts, skorts, and skirts are to be no shorter than finger-tip length.

Not Permitted: 

  • Cargo pants/shorts
  • Joggers (sweatpants), jeggings, leggings, yoga style pants
  • Pullover sweat shirts
  • Lace, see-through clothing
  • Leather or leather type material
  • Sagging or oversized pants

Coats/Jackets:

Heavy coats/jackets do not have to follow the uniform colors and are to be worn outside of the building.  Heavy coats/jackets are not to be worn during classes.

Trench coats are not permitted.

Hats and Scarves:

Hats/head gear may be worn outside with the brim/beak facing forward.  Scarves may not be worn due to safety.

Shoes:

Students may not wear open-toed shoes due to safety concerns.  Shoes with laces must be fully laced up and tied.  The same applies to Velcro strap fasteners.

Accessories:

  • No sunglasses are to be worn inside the building unless medically prescribed.
  • No bandanas or bandana print headgear, or du-rags of any kind may be worn on campus at any time or at any school sponsored activity.
  • Any item of clothing that contains metal studs or simulated studs of any type is prohibited.
  • Lanyards are to be worn around the neck or tucked entirely into a pocket.

Students appearing on school grounds in violation of the dress code policy will be counseled and may be asked to change into appropriate clothing.  For the first offense, the parents will be notified and the student will remain in class so long as the clothing is not disruptive to class learning.  On the occasion that the clothing is disruptive to class, the student will be removed from the classroom and the parents will be required to bring a change of clothes for the student.  After the second offense, the parents and student will have a conference with the Administration.  Following the third offense, the parents will be notified and the student will be given in-school suspension for multiple days or will be required to be picked up by the parent or guardian.

Since student attire trends change, the previous lists will be updated and communicated, as needed, in order to ensure an appropriate and safe school setting.  Decisions regarding the appropriateness of clothing will be handled by the Administration.

 

DRESS CODE (High School)

A good school-learning environment is created when students have an appropriate, well-groomed appearance and conduct themselves properly.  Anything that tends to detract from this environment is unacceptable.  The following guidelines shall apply to all regular school activities:

  • Sunglasses, hats, caps and other head coverings shall not be worn indoors. Only medically/religiously required headgear, approved by the principal, may be worn indoors.  Sun-protective clothing must comply with District and school site dress and grooming standards.
  • Clothes shall conceal undergarments at all times. See-through or fishnet fabrics, halter tops, off-the-shoulder or low-cut tops, and bare midriffs (showing the stomach) are prohibited.  Skirts or shorts shorter than 4-inches above the top of the knee are prohibited.  Swimwear, pajamas, nightgowns, and blankets are not appropriate school wear.
  • Pants with holes, rips, or tears that are more than 4-inches above the top of the knee are prohibited.
  • Clothing or accessories that advertise such substances as alcohol, cigarettes, drugs, or utilizes double play on words, obscenities, profanity, is gang-related, or is suggestive in any way are prohibited.
  • Clothing or accessories that depict illegal actions or use of fire-arms may not be worn.
  • Trench coats are prohibited.
  • Jewelry which poses a threat to the health and safety of students or which by its size or appearance is distracting in the learning environment (i.e., jewelry with sharp edges or which is so long or dangling as to pose a safety hazard).
  • Shoes must be worn at all times.
  • All tops must have a minimum of two fingers-width of material over the shoulder and must conceal undergarments. Sleeve openings can hang no more than 2-inches below the armpit.
  • Hooded sweatshirts and jackets must be worn with hoods down.
  • Exposed lanyards and chains hanging from the waist area are prohibited.

Students appearing on school grounds in violation of the dress policy will be counseled and given a first warning.  Repeat offenders will be sent home, as appropriate, in order to change clothes and dress properly for school.  Students may initially be counseled by the teacher with a follow up referral.  A student who willfully and continuously violates the policy may be subject to suspension.

Since student attire trends change, the previous lists will be updated and communicated as needed in order to ensure an appropriate and safe school setting.

Decisions regarding the appropriateness of clothing will be handled by the staff and/or administration.

 

Thank you,

CAS Administration

CAS Sierra Vista to Hold K-12 Open House Event on August 8th

open house flyer

High School Graduation to be Held on May 31st

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CAS High School Students Win State Championship in the Racing the Sun Solar Go Kart Challenge

Kneeling--Mr. Oh! and Mr. Dolifka; Left to Right--Kurtis Daniels, Brennan Townsend, Cynthia Ruvalcaba, Makenzi Cushman, Brandy Skattebo, Jeff Bradford, Sara Sizemore & Andrew Sizemore.

Kneeling–Mr. Oh! and Mr. Dolifka; Left to Right–Kurtis Daniels, Brennan Townsend, Cynthia Ruvalcaba, Makenzi Cushman, Brandy Skattebo, Jeff Bradford, Sara Sizemore & Andrew Sizemore

On Saturday, April 30th, high school students from the Center for Academic (CAS) in Sierra Vista brought home the state championship trophy for this year’s Racing the Sun (RTS) solar go kart races. Not only did they win the championship based on most overall points, they also won in every race they participated.  The program is run by the UofA Tech Park and involved 20 different arcing karts from 14 schools from around the state.

The students, under the direction of teachers Jeff (Mr. Oh!) Ofstedahl and Dave Dolifka, designed and built two solar-powered go karts this year and raced in two different divisions: Standard Kart and Modified Kart. In both divisions, they also won first place for fastest lap and also in the endurance race – which is completing the most laps in 20 minutes. The races were held at the Muscleman Honda Circuit track south of Tucson.

Team Member, Sara S., races around the track in one of the CAS team's go karts

Team Member, Sara S., races around the track in one of the CAS team’s solar go karts

Racing the Sun is a solar go-kart competition for high school students organized and hosted by Tech Parks Arizona, headquartered in Tucson, Arizona. High school participants from throughout the state fundraise, design, and build go-karts powered by solar photovoltaics. The purpose of the program is to help high school students develop STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) skills. The program runs concurrent with the school year. Throughout the building process, students utilize problem solving skills, apply STEM concepts in the real world, and gain experience applying solar power technology. In addition, students develop teamwork and entrepreneurial skills. During the program participants are mentored by industry and academic experts.

This was CAS’s second year competing in RTS events. Last year, they designed, built and raced one go kart and came in third place in the Standard Kart division.

CAS Solar Go Kart Team poses with their trophies

CAS Solar Go Kart Team poses with their trophies

“I’m so proud of the kids!” beamed Ofstedahl. “They worked so hard all year and their efforts really paid off.” The students start working on their karts, business plans, and fundraising plans at the beginning of the school year,” Ofstedahl explained. They also have to meet RTS deadlines throughout the year to include turning in their annual project plan, mechanical plans and electrical diagrams. In the process, he said, they are learning about how solar power works, how to wire electronic components, how to weld and build a chassis, as well as all the safety issues that go with the processes. The Solar Go Kart Team is an after school club which meets for three hours every Friday.

CAS Makenzi Driving

Neck and neck with another driver, CAS Team Member, Makenzi C., races to the finish line

Student Quotes:

“I learned that simplicity is the best way to go about things.” – Kurtis Daniels, Senior

“It took what we learned in the classroom and applied it to real life.” – Brandy Skattebo, Senior

“As Engineering Students we learned how to use our knowledge from the classroom and turn it into skills to help with the Go-Cart.” – Brandy Skattebo, Senior

“There were many new things many of us would never have experienced; Such as welding, soldering, electrical circuits, and how solar energy works.” – Brandy Skattebo, Senior

“I learned how solar panels work and mechanical engineering works into this matter.” – Cynthia Ruvalcaba, Freshman

“I learned how valuable other’s opinions and ideas can be, no matter how small.” – Brennan Townsend, Junior and Project Manager

Student Members of the Team:

Jeff Bradford, Junior
Makenzi Cushman, Freshman
Kurtis Daniels, Senior
Cynthia Ruvalcaba, Freshman
Andrew Sizemore, Freshman
Sara Sizemore, Senior
Brady Skattebo, Senior
Brennan Townsend, Junior